Jump to content

Welcome, Guest!
As per the Internet Bill of Rights, you have access to most of the forums here, but MPC is a BLM-designated white privilege zone and you must become white to have a voice. Once you respond to the registration email, someone--no one knows who--must approve your new account. You will then become "white" and your privilege will be instantly assaulted.
Support the Official Forum of Donald J. Trump's Presidency
Getting a PHAT tax refund this year? Spare your loved ones the grief of wondering how it will be divided among them. Endorse that refund check over to your favorite Internet forum, the only family you need and the only family you truly have.

Bitcoins? Gift cards? Money orders? We take them! Click here for more details. Your contributions allow us to fund botnet armies that will downvote the African-American Panther movie while review aggregation site IT staff cry in frustration. MPC is the forum that will never be taken in by wall-eyed Vice reporters promising favorable coverage.

* * * * * 11 votes

The Limits of Human Scale


  • Please log in to reply
402 replies to this topic

#381 Rhinestone Douchebag

Rhinestone Douchebag

    Posting Associate Level II

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 311 posts
  • How did you find MPC:the marginal web
  • Have you experienced sex?:No
  • Have you ever not been in a street fight?:Unanswered

Posted 02 August 2018 - 01:27 PM

Never forget, bugs buzzzz. They love buzz marketing. It's not designed to sink in, it's designed to spread. Who doesn't like community? It's an easy attention catcher. In real life, ideals often fall apart under easy and polite scrutiny. How is all that going to work? Do they answer the question, or do they keep buzzing? They usually keep buzzing, it's what they do.

What matters is the urban planning and architecture must follow the community network, values, and social mores. Not the other way around. The other way around is quintessential bug, it's primarily bug marketing to other bugs. Interpersonal networks must absolutely be valued first and foremost before anyone starts pitching community oriented built space. Social marketers claiming their firm can physically construct community and then the people living there will just get community is BS. No, grow the interpersonal networks first, then build around it to insulate it and grow it. In other words, a lot of community building has to be done first. Then when consensus is met, you can start erecting buildings and interconnected spaces and passage networks between those spaces. Neighborhood care has nothing to do with whatever urban planning fashion is in at the universities and their offshoot non-profits. That's why progressives keep getting "community" wrong. They think top down "experts" can just install community wherever while ignoring the people who are actually there. Rather than going to them and pointing out how their established norms can meet and deal with new challenges while respecting the established norms! Really, you don't need to construct community oriented space if the present community is already valuing their way of life. However, what built space and built environment can do is help to protect established strong community from community-destroying atomization in the form of; too much segmentation, specialization, and separation. Which is what compartmentalization in the form of planned separated and segmented spaces does. For example, you can't erect a bunch of fences around a place and expect people to view it as a place where one can easily walk up to a front porch and have a conversation with a neighbor. Fences are physical barriers, erected to block whatever.

Charleston is nice because it is dense (American dense), it is old and established, and it has a lot of rules that protect those who already live there. Rare in the US. Don't mess with it. If growth must happen, keep the Charleston way as it moves outwards. All of the best places in the US tend to be established. It's all the newer stuff that tends to run afoul because everything is done in reverse. Stuff just gets built, then whatever happens happens. Good luck building community that way. You can do something like this in Charleston because it's Charleston. This silly architectural/urban-planning gimmick ideology has already been tried in suburbs all over the country, it's called new urbanism. It didn't build community. The people living there didn't change much. It just made the built environment look different. Actually the people living in these developments for the past 20 years have atomized at the same rate as cosmopolitans and townies alike. So it's not the built environment driving norms, it's scale.

For a start, I would recommend less fences and easy walkability to at least some functions of day to day life. Not a policy, a recommendation. I personally like pervious objects to define space, such as bollards. Stop falling into the trap where everything revolves around absolute reliance on cars and land use laws that require absolute separation of services/amenities and housing.

#382 Joe Schmoe

Joe Schmoe

    Computer Expert

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 77 posts
  • Have you experienced sex?:Yes, in anime relationship (2-D)
  • Have you ever not been in a street fight?:Personal fantasy

Posted 02 August 2018 - 03:53 PM

Walkable communities will probably be a genuine help.   I live in a predominantly nonwhite community and it was very alienating at first.  Then I started walking 4 miles every morning.  It made me feel a lot less alienated.  Did it help me form deep, meaningful relationships with my neighbors? No, the 80 year-old immigrants  I encounter each morning speak very little English.  We don't know each other at all.  But just saying hello to someone every morning beats total isolation.   It's a small thing but it's still a help.

#383 Bonobo Mindset

Bonobo Mindset

    Posting Associate Level II

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 271 posts
  • How did you find MPC:NRx tears
  • Have you experienced sex?:Unanswered
  • Have you ever not been in a street fight?:Personal fantasy

Posted 02 August 2018 - 04:19 PM

As Rhinestone Douchebag (:lol:) points out, the new urbanists have it backwards. It's cargo cult thinking: if we can just create the outward appearance of a healthy society, perhaps people will begin conforming themselves to its inner habits. Of course, there's nothing wrong with creating attractive, pedestrian-friendly public streetscapes and reviving older modes of architectural expression. But in the end, it's the quality of the inhabitants that matters.

Every northern city has at least one neighborhood composed of formerly-elegant 19th century rowhouses that is now a howling ghetto haunted by morlocks. Solid street grid. Charming architecture. What went wrong?

#384 Alt-Right Meth Squads

Alt-Right Meth Squads

    Blogger

  • Chaperoned
  • 2 posts
  • How did you find MPC:fleeing the thought police
  • Have you experienced sex?:Unanswered
  • Have you ever not been in a street fight?:Unanswered

Posted 03 August 2018 - 08:03 AM

 Rhinestone Douchebag, on 02 August 2018 - 01:27 PM, said:

What matters is the urban planning and architecture must follow the community network, values, and social mores. Not the other way around. The other way around is quintessential bug, it's primarily bug marketing to other bugs. Interpersonal networks must absolutely be valued first and foremost before anyone starts pitching community oriented built space. Social marketers claiming their firm can physically construct community and then the people living there will just get community is BS. No, grow the interpersonal networks first, then build around it to insulate it and grow it. In other words, a lot of community building has to be done first. Then when consensus is met, you can start erecting buildings and interconnected spaces and passage networks between those spaces. Neighborhood care has nothing to do with whatever urban planning fashion is in at the universities and their offshoot non-profits. That's why progressives keep getting "community" wrong. They think top down "experts" can just install community wherever while ignoring the people who are actually there. Rather than going to them and pointing out how their established norms can meet and deal with new challenges while respecting the established norms!
This is precisely what happened in the tower blocks built in postwar Britain: buildings designed to replace strong communities in existing slums failed dismally to import those communities and then became watchwords for urban decay and crime.  This was in spite of some fairly utopian ideals about what the blocks could provide (and the enormous improvement in individual living standards from the preceding tenements).

I don't think it helped that many looked like they'd come from the same design bureau as your average pillbox, but since I've read this thread I realise a much greater problem was that the community didn't exist when people were decanted into the block and it never really had a chance to form.

Ironically, since they're now used as sink housing for migrants, some tower blocks are building rather stronger communities based on family ties.


#385 Dogmatic Tower

Dogmatic Tower

    Posting Associate Level II

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 459 posts
  • How did you find MPC:internet ... where else?
  • Have you experienced sex?:No
  • Have you ever not been in a street fight?:Yes

Posted 03 August 2018 - 08:07 PM

 Rhinestone Douchebag, on 02 August 2018 - 01:27 PM, said:

What matters is the urban planning and architecture must follow the community network, values, and social mores. Not the other way around.

One complication is that when the architecture professors tell you to do this, they fully expect you to design for buglife.  They all take buglife so completely for granted - and want to teach you to take it so completely for granted - that they actually argue that only a fearless embrace of buglife can produce urban design that reflects community network, values, and social mores.

New Urbanism was indeed attacked as cargo cult urban design, but it was attacked by people who considered it bourgeois and reactionary, not progressive.  And even then it was a shallow attack waged by people who were triggered by the movement's embrace of traditional aesthetics, not the actual ideas, which everyone pays lip service to.

#386 Habakkuk Mucklewrath

Habakkuk Mucklewrath

    Serious Internet Businessman

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1313 posts
  • How did you find MPC:ushered here by the Golem of Prague
  • Have you experienced sex?:Unanswered
  • Have you ever not been in a street fight?:Personal fantasy

Posted 30 August 2018 - 09:20 AM



TRIGGER WARNING


#387 NBDruid

NBDruid

    Computer Expert

  • Chaperoned
  • Pip
  • 61 posts
  • Have you experienced sex?:Unanswered
  • Have you ever not been in a street fight?:Yes

Posted 30 August 2018 - 09:40 AM

I brought this tweet to Taleb's attention.



This belief that Iceland's (pop. 350,000) system could be replicated in the US and work will just not die among American shitlibs. They seriously need their head examined.

#388 Jack of All Hates

Jack of All Hates

    Garbled Signals from thx G03rst Vsdw

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4739 posts
  • How did you find MPC:Across Difficult Country
  • Have you experienced sex?:Unanswered
  • Have you ever not been in a street fight?:Yes

Posted 30 August 2018 - 10:42 AM

(from hell) I had a glimpse of heaven once--a garden of eden!--why can't we just scale that up here in hell??  Why can't we have the kind of lives they do?


#389 Navalinfantry ; Catholic Anglo-Protestant

Navalinfantry ; Catholic Anglo-Protestant

    Serious Internet Businessman

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1562 posts
  • LocationThe state that begins with Ill and ends in annoy
  • How did you find MPC:preordained by God
  • Have you experienced sex?:No
  • Have you ever not been in a street fight?:Yes

Posted 30 August 2018 - 10:59 AM

Also , only seven eggplants . (Probably all in jail)

Edited by Navalinfantry ; Catholic Anglo-Protestant, 30 August 2018 - 11:03 AM.


#390 Trevor Goodchild

Trevor Goodchild

    Posting Associate Level II

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 383 posts
  • LocationBreen command node
  • How did you find MPC:The Demiurge Kek opened my eyes
  • Have you experienced sex?:Yes, in anime relationship (2-D)
  • Have you ever not been in a street fight?:Personal fantasy

Posted 30 August 2018 - 11:19 AM

 NBDruid, on 30 August 2018 - 09:40 AM, said:

I brought this tweet to Taleb's attention.



This belief that Iceland's (pop. 350,000) system could be replicated in the US and work will just not die among American shitlibs. They seriously need their head examined.

:librage: JUST BE LIKE ICELAND BIGOT

:mel: You mean a genetically and socially homogeneous population that's 91% founding stock and so dedicated to cultural preservation that they don't let you pick any names for your kids that aren't traditional Icelandic?

:duke: Sounds good, let me get some of the boys together for a little old-fashioned ethnic cleansing

:librage: NO WAIT NOT LIKE THAT!

:jewfear:

#391 Habakkuk Mucklewrath

Habakkuk Mucklewrath

    Serious Internet Businessman

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1313 posts
  • How did you find MPC:ushered here by the Golem of Prague
  • Have you experienced sex?:Unanswered
  • Have you ever not been in a street fight?:Personal fantasy

Posted 30 August 2018 - 12:00 PM

 NBDruid, on 30 August 2018 - 09:40 AM, said:

I brought this tweet to Taleb's attention.



This belief that Iceland's (pop. 350,000) system could be replicated in the US and work will just not die among American shitlibs. They seriously need their head examined.

Nice! And LMFAO at that Hoffman bug man wondering aloud why we can't have nice Icelandic things here in USA oh yes it's because of greed :lolno:

#392 Habakkuk Mucklewrath

Habakkuk Mucklewrath

    Serious Internet Businessman

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1313 posts
  • How did you find MPC:ushered here by the Golem of Prague
  • Have you experienced sex?:Unanswered
  • Have you ever not been in a street fight?:Personal fantasy

Posted 30 August 2018 - 12:09 PM


:lol: owned

TRIGGER WARNING


#393 RexLex Commander of the Chaos

RexLex Commander of the Chaos

    Serious Internet Businessman

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1708 posts
  • How did you find MPC:Cinco Jotas
  • Have you experienced sex?:Unanswered
  • Have you ever not been in a street fight?:Yes

Posted 03 September 2018 - 11:43 AM

Google and Mastercard Cut a Secret Ad Deal to Track Retail Sales

Quote

For the past year, select Google advertisers have had access to a potent new tool to track whether the ads they ran online led to a sale at a physical store in the U.S. That insight came thanks in part to a stockpile of Mastercard transactions that Google paid for.

But most of the two billion Mastercard holders aren’t aware of this behind-the-scenes tracking. That’s because the companies never told the public about the arrangement.

Quote

But some privacy critics derided the tool as opaque. EPIC submitted a complaint about the sales measuring tack to the U.S. Federal Trade Commission last year. A report in August that Facebook Inc. was talking with banks about accessing information for consumer service products sparked similar criticism. For years, Facebook and Google have worked to link their massive troves of user behavior with consumer financial data.

BURN IT ALL DOWN. Anarcho-primitivism looks better every day.

#394 Cinco Jotas

Cinco Jotas

    El Caballero de la Triste Figura

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3579 posts
  • LocationUltima Thule
  • How did you find MPC:Udolpho
  • Have you experienced sex?:No
  • Have you ever not been in a street fight?:Unanswered

Posted 03 September 2018 - 11:47 AM

 Tariff Pillow Talk with RexLex, on 03 September 2018 - 11:43 AM, said:

Google and Mastercard Cut a Secret Ad Deal to Track Retail Sales

Quote

For the past year, select Google advertisers have had access to a potent new tool to track whether the ads they ran online led to a sale at a physical store in the U.S. That insight came thanks in part to a stockpile of Mastercard transactions that Google paid for.

But most of the two billion Mastercard holders aren’t aware of this behind-the-scenes tracking. That’s because the companies never told the public about the arrangement.

Quote

But some privacy critics derided the tool as opaque. EPIC submitted a complaint about the sales measuring tack to the U.S. Federal Trade Commission last year. A report in August that Facebook Inc. was talking with banks about accessing information for consumer service products sparked similar criticism. For years, Facebook and Google have worked to link their massive troves of user behavior with consumer financial data.

BURN IT ALL DOWN. Anarcho-primitivism looks better every day.

Two words: Digital Consent.

We ain't got it in this case. The government needs to step in and protect us from these rapacious foreign corporations*.  


*"foreign" as in filled with foreigners who have access to our personal data.

Edited by Cinco Jotas, 03 September 2018 - 11:48 AM.


#395 Chainsaw Charlie

Chainsaw Charlie

    Blogger

  • Chaperoned
  • 19 posts
  • Have you experienced sex?:Unanswered
  • Have you ever not been in a street fight?:Unanswered

Posted 09 September 2018 - 02:55 PM

This poast is about the combinatorics of dating, with scale, atomization, and anomie in mind.

Two classic optimization problems, the stable marriage problem and the secretary problem, model the essential nature of dating. We argue that, in a locally bounded social world, the same optimal strategy solves both problems. Collective behavior results in stability. In a hyper-scaled disconnected society, strategies diverge, and stability collapses.

Stable Marriage on a Social Graph
The stable marriage problem gives us intuitive definitions of stability and courtship. The problem can be stated as follows:

Quote

Given n men and n women, where each person has ranked all members of the opposite sex in order of preference, marry the men and women together such that there are no two people of opposite sex who would both rather have each other than their current partners. When there are no such pairs of people, the set of marriages is deemed stable.

The solution, the Gale-Shapley algorithm, involves a number of rounds of courtship. In the end everyone gets married, and the marriages are stable.

TRIGGER WARNING

This simplistic formulation of the problem assumes a suitor can equally court every woman in the populace, and likewise, a woman can be propositioned by any suitor. Under this assumption, as the population grows, the courtship process takes an increasing number of rounds to stabilize. But clearly this is not a realistic assumption. In reality each individual interacts with a limited set of potential partners—the individual’s Dunbar circle, roughly speaking. Bob proposes to any Alice in his circle; meanwhile, Alice is propositioned by any Bob or Chad in her own circle (which may overlap a little or a lot with Bob’s circle).

In this locally bounded environment, courtship can actually work. After a few iterations, people can reach stable marriages—even as the total population far exceeds the Dunbar number.

The Secretary Problem
While the stable marriage problem addresses the overall group, the secretary problem concerns the outcome for one self-interested individual. For our the purposes, the problem can be stated as follows:

Quote

There are n people willing to date you, and the value of n is known. You can either marry or break up with each person you date. The objective is to maximize the probability of marrying the most attractive person of the whole group.

In theory, the optimal solution is to date a fixed fraction (37%) of the people and continue dating until you find someone better than the first 37%. The exact fraction doesn’t matter so much as the value of n. The key point is, if you have too many options, you won’t be content to settle after just a few partners.

At Dunbar scale, options are bounded. And as with the stable marriage problem, a good strategy is this: date at most a few different partners, try to trade up each time, and then get married. So we see that self-interested behavior (everyone striving for the best willing partner) also results in stable marriages. Plus, it fits well with normal adolescent maturation.

Sex Differences
Men and women exhibit different courtship behaviors. Men are more sexually aggressive, whereas women are more passive and selective. At Dunbar scale, this appears to be natural and healthy—or at least tempered by common norms of courtship.

Now let’s examine the circumstances that result in failure to form stable relationships.

Social Isolation
A socially isolated individual lacks an adequate Dunbar circle from which to draw a suitable partner. As a result, the individual may feel like he or she is settling for a suboptimal partner; demonstrate neediness, in a relationship or during courtship; retreat from dating entirely; or seek romance among strangers, which might involve approaching strangers in public, using dating apps, moving to a different country, or simply “putting yourself out there”.

Scale
When enough people resort to dating strangers outside their Dunbar circles, we observe the scalability problem mentioned above. Courtship stabilization requires more rounds. In other words, you have to date more people. Serial monogamy becomes commonplace.

Moreover, beyond some limit of scale, it seems stabilization never occurs at all.

Look at dating apps like Tinder, which enables interactions (as “swipes”) between every man and woman. Obviously Tinder doesn’t lead to many stable marriages. At Tinder scale, normal courtship behaviors result in total failure. Men swipe right every time, and women have their pick of the litter—from a whole city’s worth of men. Given such choice, women end up swiping the same elite group of attractive men. These men have lots of options, so often they won’t be responsive (a common complaint among women), or they will go with the easiest option for sex—hence Tinder’s reputation for hookups. Meanwhile most men get nothing.

So at scale we see marked inequity in the dating market. We see exaggerated hypergamy. We see more transient and shallow interactions. We see a decreased rate of successful interactions, crushing everyone’s emotional energy. We see behavioral dysfunction: thirstier men, sluttier women, incels, gymcels, beautiful rats. We see widespread demoralization, which leads to anomie.

Anomie
Everyone has to be playing the same game. Marriage has to be the norm for courtship to work. When hookups and serial monogamy are widespread, of course stable marriages don’t develop. This anomie leaves people isolated. And as we’ve seen, scale drives anomie. And isolation drives scale. It’s all one big positive feedback loop.

#396 Habakkuk Mucklewrath

Habakkuk Mucklewrath

    Serious Internet Businessman

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1313 posts
  • How did you find MPC:ushered here by the Golem of Prague
  • Have you experienced sex?:Unanswered
  • Have you ever not been in a street fight?:Personal fantasy

Posted 11 September 2018 - 12:57 PM

Introducing: Tribal Fractalism, an Axiomatic Principle for Politics Under Complexity

Posted Image

Quote

If you are friends with everyone, you are nobody's friend. And if you treat all mankind the same, in other words without some preferential treatment to your own children, you will turn out to be an unreliable parent--eventually threatening their own survival. Pure universalism at its ad absurdum limit implies you drop off a kid at school in the morning and randomly pick another in the afternoon.

The rules of societal symmetry cannot hold without some structure: you form a group with your own family; I form one with my own. This renormalizes to tribes that can be as self-defined as needed.

Yoram Hazony detected the necessity of tribal fractality (not his words): society can only work under such structures that have in-group vs. out-group behavior: "Me and my brother against my cousin; me, my brother and cousin against the outsider", etc.

:taleb:



#397 Chainsaw Charlie

Chainsaw Charlie

    Blogger

  • Chaperoned
  • 19 posts
  • Have you experienced sex?:Unanswered
  • Have you ever not been in a street fight?:Unanswered

Posted 11 September 2018 - 07:37 PM

Principles 1 through 5 and 8 are great, but 6 and 7 are disappointing. Taleb is obviously trying to get at conservatives’ sentiment of fairness and resistance to social change. But he doesn’t provide any real insight, just equivocating statements.

Quote

Principle 6: Minority and Majority Rules

Neither the minority nor the majority should be able to impose their preferences on others.
  • An expansion to the concept "leave me alone and, in return, I will leave you alone".
  • It is clearly unreasonable that communities that represent .1% of the population impose their preferences on others, particularly when there is a high cost to that. But it is necessary that individuals be treated with the proper amount of fairness.

What makes a community? Are homosexuals a community?

Let’s say a pure community is an independent, strongly connected subcomponent of society. The opposite of a community is a parasitic network. The .1% of the population that are Amish form a community; the .1% that are pedophiles are a parasitic network. Blacks are somewhere in between.

Parasitic networks disrupt real communities and should be treated accordingly.

Quote

Principle 7: Rationally Progressive

Rationally progressive means embracing progress by accepting a certain rate of change deemed optimal. Too high a rate of change cancel the gains from previous mutations; while too slow a change leads to misfitness.
  • Again "conservative" or "progressive" are meaningless in that sense.
  • In addition consider that too fast a rate of change leads, simply, to regression.
  • Recall the metaphor: driving at 600 mph is certainly never the fastest way to get somewhere.

Again, what do we mean by "change" or "progression" or "regression"?

Let's define change in terms of Taleb's fractal gradations. Consider a group of communities at a given scale and their parent layer. Let’s define change as restructuring or merging among child communities, or, recursively, change within a child. Now we have a sense of magnitude of change: the complexity of the restructuring.

Examples:
  • Discarding the electoral college. This would be a parent level reordering. Low complexity change.
  • Racial integration is a horizontal merging of racial communities. High complexity change.
  • A company adopting flat management is vertically merging. Complexity depends on the size of the company.

Large change creates conflict, which is undesirable, and it can also propagate unintended disruptive changes throughout broader society. A fractal hierarchical structure is beneficial in that it can buffer against small, adaptive change. But it has its limits. Instead of "progression" and "regression" let's think of whether these limits are exceeded or not.

And surely not all change is equal, no matter how slow. Slow change that results in an unrecognizably different community is not in the original community’s interest.

#398 Maximus Meridius Demidius

Maximus Meridius Demidius

    Serious Internet Businessman

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1786 posts
  • LocationThe City of Lovely Brothers
  • How did you find MPC:Via fatty pickup cheatcode guide, Heartiste
  • Have you experienced sex?:Unanswered
  • Have you ever not been in a street fight?:Personal fantasy

Posted 11 September 2018 - 08:44 PM

 Chainsaw Charlie, on 09 September 2018 - 02:55 PM, said:

This poast is about the combinatorics of dating, with scale, atomization, and anomie in mind.


Interesting thought experiment. If anything, it probably underestimates the problems of scale in mating. In a modern urban scaled Bughive, the Dunbar circle of any given man or woman of courting age is probably weighted towards other people of courting age contrasted with the Dunbar circle of people in more traditional societies. Your circle is "flatter" as it were, since it doesn't include many multilateral inter-generational relationships. In a de-scaled environment, you'd know your possible mates' relatives possibly from grandparents down to siblings, and vice versa, so the circle is more textured and each individual in it more contextualized by their own relationships. You're better able to asses the suitability of more potential mates simultaneously - it wouldn't necessarily require dating as many as possible while making serial marginal upgrades when able. In the "flat" circles of Bughives, context is much more superficial - which bars and restaurants and "scene" other people in the circle frequent, etc., and people probably cycle in and out far more frequently.

A de-scaled environment solves the "hot slut problem," in that you have a far greater data set to determine if a potential mate who is attractive is loose and not worth a long term investment (as well as an incentive for a woman to mind her reputation generally and remain suitable wife material in the process). The anonymity of the Bughive makes this much less possible.

#399 PLEASUREMAN

PLEASUREMAN

    "Jew Lover From MPC"

  • Administrators
  • 37711 posts
  • How did you find MPC:I created it
  • Have you experienced sex?:No
  • Have you ever not been in a street fight?:Unanswered

Posted 11 September 2018 - 10:29 PM

I don't think I'm going to have to write a book, because Taleb is going to make a much better version of it.

#400 Rutger Kipling

Rutger Kipling

    Forums Account Manager

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 534 posts
  • How did you find MPC:Udolpho's post about nerds
  • Have you experienced sex?:No
  • Have you ever not been in a street fight?:Unanswered

Posted 12 September 2018 - 06:27 PM

 PLEASUREMAN, on 11 September 2018 - 10:29 PM, said:

I don't think I'm going to have to write a book, because Taleb is going to make a much better version of it.

I still want to publish yours.


MPC is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com.